Resources
Here are some sources of information that might be of interest


Veteran's possible Business HELP!
Volunteer teacher Denise Chapman, at the BRENHAM Community Center in Texas, has sent this information which was FOUND by her Students working on their Vietnam Project. This web site has many areas for Veterans to them possibly Start their Own Business. The web site looks Great to me, Thank You guys at Brenham Community Center. Glad to SHARE it with ALL veterans but think the Younger Veterans will use it more.

https://www.commercialcapitaltraining.com/business-resources/business-ideas/veteran-business-ideas iere

 



Veteran's Benefits
Get the latest scoop on your VA benefits by visiting the Department of Veteran's Affairs web site.


Military Personnel Records - NPRC(MPR)
Through this site, you can request the military records of yourself or family members.


Military Personnel Records -Military Medals and Awards
Find out what ribbons and awards you are officially entitled to wear.Any individual who wants to have their awards and decorations reviewed and a replacement (one-time) set issued can write to: NPRC, 9700 Page Avenue, St Louis, MO 63132-5000.   Upon receipt NPRC will access the appropriate records, attach the request, and send the case to AFPC to work.  Include name, Service Number, SSAN, inclusive dates in the service, DD Forms 214 if available, and current mailing address.  Ask that the records be reviewed for additional unit or individual awards and decorations not reflected on the DD Form 214, correction of the DD Form 214, and issuance of a complete replacement set of awards and decorations if desired.  Veterans should expect to wait at least four-six months for a response.  Any request for changes to a DD Form 214 should be accompanied by the necessary documents to substantiate the claim.  Questions regarding Air Force awards/decorations can be emailed to Georgia.Wise@randolph.af.mil   .  Queries on verification cannot be answered unless your request was previously submitted in writing with the requester's signature to NPRC.

Vietnam Cross of Gallantry
Vietnam Cross of Gallantry Update: The previous Bulletin article on the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm award was incomplete.   Readers should review the following before taking any action:  The Vietnam Cross of Gallantry can be an individual or unit award for bravery in combat.  For unit awards the RVN government distinguished between units serving in combat support of the Republic and in civic action support (or both) awarding the RVN Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Unit Citation to combat units and the the RVN Civic Actions Honor Medal, First Class, Unit Citation to logistic units.  According to the Department of the Army General Order DA GO 8 1974 the Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with Palm was awarded to Headquarters U. S. Military Assistance Command (MACV) and all
its subordinate units during the period  8 FEB 1962 to 28 MAR 1973.  All military personnel who were assigned to units serving in-country Vietnam during this period  were considered assigned to MACV  and its subordinate units, regardless of service or component.  Under DA GO 43 1970 the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry was awarded to all military personnel of all branches who served in-country Vietnam between 1 MAR 1961 and 28 MAR 1973 and to U.S. Army Vietnam and its subordinate units for the period 20 JUL 1965 to 28 MAR 1973.  Both of these DAGOs should be listed in Army Pamphlet 672-3 which contains all units specifically cited and is the guideline used by NPRC for making corrections to DD-214s.  This is a foreign award that was issued by the Army of South
Vietnam.  When awarded to U.S. military personnel it was awarded with Silver Star (the equivalent to the US Army Silver Star) or with Bronze Star (equivalent to the US Bronze Star).  It is also the equivalent of the French Croix de Guerre.  When awarded to units it was always with Gold Palm.  As with U.S. unit awards all personnel in the unit during the period of action for which the award is given may wear the award at all times.  Individuals not in the unit during the designated period can wear the award only while assigned to the unit.  As a foreign decoration the Vietnamese Cross may not be worn until the award is approved by the US
Department of State. That approval is then passed to the Department of Army and a General Order for the award is published [i.e. DA GO 43 1970 & DA GO
8 1974].  If you never received a medal, ribbon, or certificate it cannot be reissued by NPRC since this is a foreign award    However, amended discharge papers (DD-215) can be issued if the citation is not listed on your DD-214.  If you want to confirm your eligibility you can request an amendment by submitting a Standard Form 180 (SF-180) to the National Personnel Records Command (NPRC).  This form can be downloaded at www.fra.org/links ,
http://members.aol.com/forvets/htomr.htm , or http://www.archives.gov/facilities/mo/st_louis/military_personnel_records/standard_form_180.html.  
Veterans who cannot access the Internet may call 1-800-FRA-1924 to request the form. Further information is also available from your local VA office.

Any individual who wants to have their awards and decorations reviewed and a replacement (one-time) set issued can write to: NPRC, 9700 Page Avenue, St Louis, MO 63132-5000.  Upon receipt NPRC will access the appropriate records, attach the request, and send the case to AFPC to work.  Include name, Service Number, SSAN, inclusive dates in the service, DD Forms 214 if available, and current mailing address.   Ask that the records be reviewed for additional unit or individual awards and decorations not reflected on the DD Form 214, correction of the DD Form 214, and issuance of a complete replacement set of awards and decorations if desired.  Veterans should expect to wait at least four-six months for a response.  Any request for changes to a DD Form 214 should be accompanied
by the necessary documents to substantiate the claim.  Questions regarding Air Force awards/decorations can be emailed to Georgia.Wise@randolph.af.mil  .  Queries on verification cannot be answered unless your request was previously submitted in writing with the requester's signature to NPRC.

Many vets never received their Vietnam Cross of Gallantry who were eligible.  The medal and ribbon can be viewed at www.campeagle101.com. A
certificate suitable for framing can be purchased for a fee at  CampEagle101@aol.com.   [Source: Armed Forces News 3 JAN 03, FRA News-Bytes 0 JAN 03, VWV President Claire Starnes
www.campeagle101.com & http://members.aol.com/bn61st/vcg.htm ]


Ribbon Checker
This site, put together by LTJG Michael R. Gustafson, shows all the ribbons authorized by the United States Marine Corps and the proper order in which they are to be worn.


Discharge Information
If you are looking to upgrade a discharge for whatever reason, the organization to contact is:
Naval Discharge Review Board (NDRB)
Bldg 36, Washington Navy Yard
901 M Street, SE
Washington, DC 20374-5023
Phone: 202/685-6600
Ask for a DD Form 293 (Request to petition the Board).They handle discharges 15 years or less.

If you need to correct something in your jacket, or if your discharge was more than 15 years ago and you want to upgrade it or change the basis, contact:
Board for the Correction of Naval Records (BCNR)
2 Navy Annex, Room 2432
Washington, DC 20370-5100
Phone: 703/614-2133/9849/9851
Ask for DD Form 149.

A more detailed address for NPRC is:
National Personnel Records Center
9700 Page Blvd, Room 5007
ATTN: Marine Corps Liaison Office
St Louis, MO 63132-5295
Phone: 314/538-3155/3323/(FAX) 3115


Service Records Request
Service Records for DISCHARGED Marines can be requested by a family member free of charge from:
National Personnel Records Center
9700 Page Blvd, Room 5007
St Louis, Mo 63132-5295


Provide them as much information about the service member as possible, rank, ssn, mos, ect., and what information you are looking for.


Combat Action Reports (Vietnam)
These reports give a brief description of unit activities for a given period of time (usually monthly). Give unit and time period you are interested in. Service is free for first inquiry. Write to:
Marine Corps Historical Center
Washington Navy Yard
Washington, D.C. 20374-0580


Field Rosters (Vietnam)
Having troubles remembering names of men you served with. These rosters contain the names of men serving with a particular unit during a specific month.
Commandant of the Marine Corps
Headquarters USMC
(Code-MMSB-10)
Suite 201
Elliot Rd.
Quantico, VA 22134-5030
(703)784-3920


Books About 1st Battalion/3d Marines Vietnam

Con Thien The Hill of Angels by James Coan (University of Alabama Press)
Written by someone who was there. James Coan was a Tanker at Con Thien during 1967 and knows how to bring the hardships and living conditions to life on the page. This book gives an accurate history of this important base and the roll the Trace played in the war. Very good reading.

Grunts
by Charles Anderson (Berkley Press)
This book is written about Bravo Company's experiences under the command of Capt. Gerald Sampson in 1969. Good book with a lot of insight about what a field unit in Vietnam was like.

Operation Buffalo by Keith William Nolan (Dell Publishing)
This is the story of the battle north of Con Thien in 1967. Told by the men who were involved, this book covers one of the toughest battles of the war.

After Tet by Ronald Spector (Free Press)
Not limited to the Third Marines, this book gives a comprehensive study of the war after the Tet Offensive of 1968. Good reading with an over-all view of the war from many perspectives.

Rumor of War by Philip Caputo (Bantom Books)
Philip Caputo served as a young officer with the 9th Marine Expedititionary Brigade. His account of the early days of the war has become classic reading material for the Vietnam reader.  The Third Marines were part of this element that made up the first ground forces in Vietnam in 1965

U.S. Marines in Vietnam 1969 History and Museum Division USMC
This official publication of the Marine Corps is one of a series they have published about the Marine Corps in Vietnam. It is full of information about Marine activities during the war years.

Pay Back by Joe Klein
This great book deals not only with the war but surviving afterwards

Semper Fi - Vietnam by Edward F. Murphy
 Presidio Press 1997 (reprint 2000), 345 pages
A sort of blow-by-blow from '65 - '75 of key campaigns/actions. Organized around operations...and hilighting key actions (including small-unit firefights...though usually those in which a participant was awarded a Navy Cross or above...a la Capt Sampson on Muttter's Ridge).  If you don't find your name, you'll definately find a description of the Ops you served in!
 
Vietnam - the Necessary War  by Michael Lind
Simon & Schuster/Touchstone, 1999 & 2002, 314 pages
- a rarity: a slightly right-wing academic assessment of the VN war in light of the concurrent on -going  "cold" war with USSR/China.  Much of Dr Lind's book is dry-as-stone (references, footnotes, etc), but in it he quickly and effectively refutes (with this documentation) so many of the VN-era myths that have been perpetuated by the liberal press that it's worthwhile. 
- On the other hand, he devastates the top-level military brass (Westmoreland, etc) who wanted to "play with their new toys" and not listening to the old hands at fighting "insurgencies" ("Brute" Krulak, Lew Walt, et al...many, if not most, USMC).

One Four Man Up by Robert E. Hunt (Infinity Publishing)
Bob Hunt served in Alpha Company 1/3 as the Tactical Air Controlman (one four man) from April 30, 1968 to May 19, 1969.  After participating in many horrific battles and being wounded in action, Bob returned home to a different kind of war, the war inside.  He endures 20 years of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and has trouble fitting back into the world he left behind.  Haunted by memories of lost friends, he finally comes full circle when he receives the welcome home he never had.  A great personal account of the peak of the Vietnam war told by an ex-Marin

"CLASS of 67" by Jack Wells
Three years ago I had a book published, Class of 67.  In the book are three chapters on 1/3 Marines and about the battle action where they lost their lives.  There are over 150 color, b&w photos in the book + a dozen maps.  The men in the 3 chapters are:  Lt Michael Odell, Lt Ralph Gorton, and Lt  Tom Keppen.  The book is on Amazon and their is a Kindle version for $9.99.  Lt Tom Keppen and his B 1/3 radio operator are on the cover. s/f Jack Wells A 1/7

 

 

 

If you know of any other books about the Third Marines in Vietnam,
please let me know about them so I can add them to our library.