Corporal David S. Rozumniak (Silver Star - 27May65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal David Scott Rozumniak (MCSN: 2042331), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader with the First Platoon, Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 27 May 1965, approximately nine miles southwest of DaNang, Corporal Rozumniak was in the lead elements of his unit engaged in the search of the village of La Chau when his unit was taken under a heavy volume of fire from concealed Communist Insurgent positions across the river at the village of An Trach. Corporal Rozumniak instantly deployed his men into the already prepared trench line on the north side of the river. He immediately and aggressively led his men forward to the point where the enemy fire was most concentrated, exposing himself constantly in an effort to locate targets for his squad. Upon noticing three of the insurgents moving to new firing positions he personally pursued them by fire and succeeded in killing two and wounding the third. He then directed his attached weapons and grenadier to neutralize the various insurgent strongpoints dug in on the south bank of the river. Corporal Rozumniak is also credited with spotting and sinking a raft capable of transporting up to thirty men at a time. This was obviously the vehicle utilized by the insurgents to cross the river when confronted with Marines. It was also Corporal Rozumniak who detected a Communist Insurgent dug in on the Marine side of the river and moved immediately to annihilate him by exposing himself to the full fury of the enemy's fire in an attempt to dislodge the insurgent with fragmentation grenades. Corporal Rozumniak is credited with wounding this man. It should be noted that at least one insurgent platoon was engaged and at least 1,000 small arms rounds were exchanged by both sides in a fire fight of approximately one hour in length. The enemy fire was thought to be so intense and concentrated that friendly mortars were utilized to neutralize the enemy's strongpoints. Corporal Rozumnik's squad is credited with gaining fire superiority over a well prepared and well entrenched enemy. His aggressive and forceful leadership, coolness under fire, and spirited determination to press on and destroy the enemy was an inspiration to his entire platoon. Corporal Rozumniak set an example that was in the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


03Jun65 to 05Jun65                            Operation Order 327-65


Sergeant Hugh John Sullivan (Silver Star Posthumously - 5Jun65)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Hugh John Sullivan, Jr. (MCSN: 1915920), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity during operations against the enemy while serving as a machine gun squad leader in Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, near the village of La Chau on the bank of the Song Yen River in Vietnam on 5 June 1965. When the rifle platoon to which he was attached was attacked by a Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons from well-concealed positions he quickly moved a machine gun into a position from which accurate fire could be brought to bear on the enemy in order that wounded men could be safely evacuated. He remained in this area approximately two hours, with complete disregard for his own safety, fearlessly exposing himself to enemy fire in order to improve the location of the gun. During one such movement of the gun in order to protect the landing of a helicopter ambulance, he was mortally wounded and died two hours later. His aggressiveness and coolness under fire undoubtedly saved other Marines from injury or death. Sergeant Sullivan's bravery, determined fighting spirit and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of his comrades were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.


Corporal Delbert E. Clark (Silver Star - 5Jun65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Delbert E. Clark (MCSN: 2036461), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy near the village of La Chau on the River Song Yet, Vietnam, on 5 June 1965. When his platoon was pinned down by extremely accurate Viet Cong fire from prepared positions across the river, Corporal Clark, serving as a Squad Leader in Company C, placed his squad in position to return fire to good advantage. His squad had already suffered two casualties and any person emerging from a covered position drew fire. When Corporal Clark discovered that there was no smoke available to signal a helicopter ambulance, without any thought as to his own personal safety he ran into the open area exposing himself to heavy enemy fire and, using his shirt to signal with, remained in this position until he had successfully guided the helicopter into the area from which it was to evacuate his wounded fellow Marines. Corporal Clark repeated this heroic act of bravery and coolness under fire on five separate occasions and not until all of the Company's wounded were successfully evacuated did he again seek shelter. In once instance, his action enabled the evacuation of a seriously wounded sergeant who would otherwise have died of his wounds. Through his unselfish devotion to duty and complete disregard for his own life, Corporal Clark undoubtedly saved the life of one or more of his fellow Marines, and in so doing upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service


Corpsman Third Class Charles G. Campion (Silver Star - 5Jun65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charles G. Campion (NSN: 373910), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, on 5 June 1965, near the village of La Chau, Republic of Vietnam. While giving medical aid to several sick villagers, Petty Officer Campion was attacked by other villagers at the time that his platoon was attacked by the Viet Cong. Fighting his way free, he ran to the platoon position and immediately began medical treatment of two wounded Marines. In order to protect the wounded men, he seized an automatic rifle from one of the men and turned it against the enemy, killing one Viet Cong and driving the others to flight. After the wounded Marines were evacuated, he fearlessly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire so he could render aid to another casualty and assist in his evacuation. By his daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk, Petty Officer Campion upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal Lawrence W. Emery (Silver Star - 29Jun65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Lawrence W. Emery (MCSN: 2012328), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF. On 29 June 1965, while on patrol near DaNang, Republic of Vietnam, Corporal Emery and several members of his squad were wounded by a land mine as they crossed a rice paddy. Disregarding the wound he had sustained in his chest, Corporal Emery quickly dispersed the rest of his squad in a hasty defense and began administering first aid to the wounded. With the arrival of a Corpsman to continue the first aid efforts, Corporal Emery placed the remainder of his squad into position around an emergency landing zone. Only after ensuring that all of the wounded had been treated did Corporal Emery pause to have his own wounds treated. During the medical evacuation, the squad came under heavy enemy hostile fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Emery repeatedly and fearlessly exposed himself in order to insure that the wounded were in a covered position and effective return fire was directed upon the enemy. Corporal Emery remained at the landing site until all of the wounded were evacuated. By his initiative, inspiring leadership and courageous actions, Corporal Emery upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Staff Sergeant Laurence Anthony Martin (Silver Star -29Jun65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Laurence Anthony Martin (MCSN: 517200), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 29 June 1965. While leading the platoon's point squad across a rice paddy dike, Staff Sergeant Martin was badly injured by a land mine which detonated directly in front of him. Disregarding his wounds, he immediately positioned the unit, insuring that they were safely behind cover. Still ignoring his own wounds, he quickly began treating the more seriously wounded around him. After the Corpsman arrived to continue administering aid, Staff Sergeant Martin, without hesitation, moved forward to a concealed area and established an emergency landing site for helicopter evacuation of the wounded. He then assisted in carrying the critically wounded forward. When heavy enemy small arms fire engaged the landing site, Staff Sergeant Martin, disregarding exposure to the enemy fire, moved from position to position throughout the perimeter defenses. He remained in the landing site insuring engagement of enemy targets and maintenance of proper security to all sides until he finally was lifted out by the last helicopter. Staff Sergeant Martin's initiative and coolness under fire, though badly wounded, decisively contributed to the prompt treatment of the wounded and their quick, efficient evacuation. By his courageous actions, Staff Sergeant Martin upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


First Lieutenant Michael J. Byron (Silver Star - 1Jul65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Michael J. Byron (MCSN: 0-88284), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 1 July 1965. While moving to an ambush site during the hours of darkness, the reinforced squad-size patrol suffered heavy casualties from the detonation of an enemy mine. Although injured himself, First Lieutenant Byron refused medical aid until all of his wounded men were treated. Attempted helicopter evacuation was driven off by extremely accurate and intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. With half of his small force having become casualties and realizing the precarious situation he faced, First Lieutenant Byron called for and personally directed the reinforcement of his unit by the remainder of the platoon and other elements of the company. For over two hours, in spite of a disabling wound, he skillfully directed three separate units through terrain occupied by enemy ambush forces, successfully joining these units and subsequently withdrawing his forces to a safe area without incurring further casualties. Having seen to the evacuation of his dead and wounded men, First Lieutenant Byron remained with his men until ordered to be evacuated. By his daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of personal risk, First Lieutenant Byron upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal Brian James Gauthier (Navy Cross Posthumously - 11Jul65)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Corporal Brian James Gauthier (MCSN: 2007664), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Marine Rifle Squad Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam during the early morning of 11 July 1965. While moving to an ambush position, eight miles southwest of DaNang, Corporal Gauthier's squad suffered heavy casualties from the detonation of an enemy mine and subsequent secondary explosions. Shortly thereafter his unit came under Viet Cong fire from several directions. Although wounded by the initial blast, he persistently refused medical aid until all of the casualties had been treated, meanwhile reorganizing his squad, establishing a defensive perimeter around the wounded, and directing fire against the enemy. During this time a helicopter attempted to evacuate the casualties but was driven off by intensive enemy machine gun fire. For a period of over two hours he continued to shout encouragement and direction to his men until he succumbed to his wounds. Corporal Gauthier's gallant leadership, indomitable fighting spirit, and inspiring devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


First Lieutenant Leonard C. Hayes (Silver Star - 17Jul65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Leonard C. Hayes (MCSN: 0-84167), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, on 17 July 1965. During a two platoon combat patrol, First Lieutenant Hayes, the acting Company Commander, and his unit were taken under small arms and automatic weapons fire by a well entrenched and concealed Viet Cong force of company size near the village of La Chau in the Republic of Vietnam. Immediately pressing the attack, First Lieutenant Hayes deployed his forces and directed heavy fire against the well concealed enemy. When the leading platoon suffered several casualties from an enemy mine field explosion, he skillfully effected a helicopter evacuation of the dead and wounded and continued to lead the attack. Later when his unit again suffered several casualties from a second mine field explosion, and while under intense enemy fire which included .50 caliber machine guns and 60 mm mortars, First Lieutenant Hayes again successfully directed a helicopter evacuation of the casualties. While under fire, First Lieutenant Hayes, moving in the open from one position to another, reorganized his forces and skillfully maneuvered one platoon to seize a key terrain feature vital to his advance. Leading his unit, he continued the attack through the village complex, at times receiving enemy fire from four directions. When his advance was stopped by the superior enemy force, First Lieutenant Hayes calmly called for and directed counter mortar fire, an artillery concentration and an air strike which, with the fire from his unit, effectively silenced the enemy opposition and permitted the patrol to continue. By his daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of personal risk, First Lieutenant Hayes upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service


Hospital Corpsman-Petty Officer Robert J. Bardwell (Silver Star - 17Jul65)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Robert J. Bardwell (NSN: 6897172), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force while serving as a Platoon Corpsman for the 1st Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, during a search and clear operation on 17 July 1965, in the La Chau Village complex, Republic of Vietnam. When the lead element of the second platoon encountered a mine field and was simultaneously brought under Viet Cong fire from several directions, Petty Officer Bardwell, upon receiving a call from the adjacent unit, left his platoon and maneuvered approximately 200 yards across an open rice paddy in the face of heavy fire to locate and administer aid to two Marines, one of whom had been critically wounded by a mine detonation. With additional injuries being sustained by members of his own platoon as the intensity of the fire increased, he again ignored the mortar and automatic weapons fire impacting nearby, returned to his unit via the same open rice paddy and encountered two other Marines requiring medical attention. After administering necessary first aid measures, he assisted the senior corpsman in directing medical evacuation of the wounded by helicopter while under a heavy volume of hostile fire directed into the landing zone. Petty Officer Bardwell's heroism under fire, his resourceful and decisive action, and his determined devotion to his comrades was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


First Lieutenant John Dudley Dalhouse (Silver Star - 14Feb66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John Dudley Dalhouse (MCSN: 0-89075), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. While returning from friendly lines on 14 February 1966, a Marine amphibian tractor struck and detonated a large insurgent communist (Viet Cong) mine, immediately bursting into flames. Atop a hill three hundred meters away, First Lieutenant Dalhouse saw the blazing, crippled tractor and immediately dashed down the hill to render aid to any survivors. Seeing a group of Marines trapped inside, First Lieutenant Dalhouse, with complete disregard for his own safety, fought his way through the flames to gain entrance to the vehicle. Undaunted by a secondary explosion and the danger of exploding small arms ammunition and grenades, First Lieutenant Dalhouse entered the tractor and found one of the men still alive, though unconscious. Unhesitatingly, he carried the Marine out of the inferno to safety and began administering first aid as another explosion rocket the amphibian tractor, making a second entrance impossible. Ignoring his own suffering from burns, First Lieutenant Dalhouse continued to help prepare the Marine for evacuation by helicopter. By his courageous actions, bold initiative and uncommon concern for the welfare of others at great risk to his own safety, First Lieutenant Dalhouse upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Hospital Corpsman Third Class Thomas A. Mullen (Silver Star - 14Feb66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman (HM3) Thomas A. Mullen (NSN: 9037446), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Corpsman with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, in connection with operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 14 February 1966, Hospitalman Mullen was established with his unit at an observation post near the hamlet of Le My when an amphibian tractor, operating about three hundred meters away, detonated a land mine and burst into flames. Grabbing his medical kit, Hospitalman Mullen raced to help the occupants of the tractor. Undaunted by the ammunition which was exploding in the fierce fire, he was treating the wounded men who had been blown off the top of the tractor when he noticed that one casualty was still trapped inside. Making his way through ten feet of waist deep mud, he entered the blazing tractor and pulled the wounded Marine to safety. As he smothered the man's burning clothing with his hands, he used his own body to shield the man from further danger as the tractor continued to burn, then exploded a second time. His swift treatment of the wounded men significantly eased their suffering and undoubtedly saved the lives of many. By his exceptional bravery at great risk of his life, superior professional skill and unfaltering dedication to duty throughout, Hospitalman Mullen upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal Manuel Avalos Jr. (Silver Star - 2Mar66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Manuel Avalos, Jr. (MCSN: 2080450), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 2 March 1966, the platoon in which Corporal Avalos was serving as a Fire Team Leader was subjected to intense enemy fire and became pinned down in an open field near the hamlet of Ngoc Kinh. Exhibiting exceptional valor and disregard for his own safety, Corporal Avalos on four occasions left his position of relative safety to advance through the murderous enemy fire and bring wounded Marines back to an area where they could receive medical treatment. In the course of the firefight, when both his squad leader and another fire team leader became casualties, Corporal Avalos unhesitatingly assumed command of the squad. With keen judgment and daring initiative, he skillfully maneuvered the fire teams in a manner which enabled his squad to be the only Marine unit which reached a treeline surrounding the village. From this position, extremely effective fire was directed at the deeply entrenched enemy force. His resolute effort throughout the engagement was a source of inspiration to all who observed him. By his outstanding professional skill, fortitude in the face of enemy fire and unfaltering dedication to duty throughout, Corporal Avalos upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


01Apr66  to  11Apr66                                    ORANGE


Lance Corporal Alexander John Ne Menzies (Silver Star Posthumously - 2Apr66)

 The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Alexander John Ne Menzies (MCSN: 2133773), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as an Automatic Rifleman with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 2 April 1966, during Operation ORANGE, Lance Corporal Menzies' platoon was pinned down in an open field by an estimated company of Viet Cong. One of the M-60 machine guns was running low of ammunition and, with total disregard for his own safety, Lance Corporal Menzies crawled through twenty meters of withering enemy small arms and machine gun fire to obtain the needed ammunition. Returning through the same hail of deadly fire, he carried the ammunition back to the machine gun which allowed continued employment of this weapon. Again, when the same machine gun required a change of barrels, he left his position of safety and crawled through the enemy fire to obtain the barrel and returned with it. Observing that his Squad Leader had been hit by enemy fire in front of his squad's position, he crawled into the exposed area and pulled him to safety. Returning to his machine gun position, Lance Corporal Menzies was fatally wounded by enemy fire. By his extraordinary courage in the face of extreme danger, intrepid fighting spirit and selfless dedication to duty throughout, Lance Corporal Menzies upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Lance Corporal Daniel Joseph Piotrowski (Silver Star Posthumously - 2Apr66)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Daniel Joseph Piotrowski (MCSN: 2122153), United States Marine Corps, for heroic achievement in connection with operations against the enemy while serving with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, at Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 April 1966. The point man on Corporal Piotrowski's squad was wounded and pinned down by intense enemy fire in an exposed position. As the squad leader rushed to the aid of the wounded Marine, Corporal Piotrowski reacted without concern for his own safety. He immediately set in his automatic rifle in a completely exposed position in order to lay down a base of covering fire for his two comrades. Even though under fire himself, he remained at his position and continued the protective fire until the two Marines reached safety. Corporal Piotrowski's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.


Lance Corporal Claude G. Lebas (Navy Cross - 2Apr66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lance Corporal Claude G. Lebas (MCSN: 2141933), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Rifleman with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, at Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 April 1966. When his platoon came under heavy automatic-weapons and mortar fire, Corporal Lebas, sighting the enemy mortar position, withdrew to the rear and retrieved three assault weapons. Returning alone through an open area covered by heavy fire from two directions, he single-handedly destroyed the enemy mortar position just as it was adjusting fire on the company command group. Upon returning to his platoon, it was discovered that a machine gunner had been killed and that he and his weapon were one hundred meters forward of the secured position. Even though his platoon was assuming a reserve position, Corporal Lebas turned and, while shouting for covering fire, rushed out to retrieve the weapon. The enemy fire was so intense that his covering force was driven back to a more secure area. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Lebas grabbed the gun and returned to safety amid a hail of bullets. It was later learned that two enemy rounds were imbedded in his haversack, stopped only by the rations he was carrying. Corporal Lebas' actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


First Lieutenant Willis Charles Wilson (Navy Cross - 2Apr66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to First Lieutenant Willis Charles Wilson (MCSN: 0-87454), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Platoon Commander with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against communist forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 2 April 1966. During Operation ORANGE, Lieutenant Wilson's platoon became heavily engaged with the enemy near the hamlet of Lap Thuan. Intense enemy mortar fire, close-range small-arms fire, and barbed wire obstacles covered by automatic weapons prevented the forward movement of the platoon. Although painfully wounded during the initial mortar barrage, Lieutenant Wilson courageously moved up and down his platoon's positions, directing his men and judiciously ordering the deployed squads to bypass the barbed wire in an attempt to eliminate the Viet Cong threat. When his platoon sergeant was wounded and became entangled in the barbed wire, Lieutenant Wilson, with complete disregard for his own safety, started across seventy-five meters of open terrain in an attempt to retrieve the mortally wounded man, who was still being hit by small-arms fire. Before he could reach the sergeant's position, Lieutenant Wilson was caught in the hail of small-arms fire and seriously wounded in the shoulder. Although thwarted in the rescue effort, he competently resumed direction of the platoon and established a strong base of fire to provide cover for a deployed squad. When a radio operator was wounded in a sudden flurry of Viet Cong fire, Lieutenant Wilson again braved the withering fire to assist the man. For the third time, he was hit, sustaining a serious wound in the chest from small-arms fire. With extraordinary determination and presence of mind, he continued to maintain direction of his platoon. Increasing the rate of fire from his base squads, he launched an attack by the enveloping squad which finally silenced the Viet Cong fire. By his exceptional valor despite his suffering from multiple wounds, daring initiative and unswerving dedication to duty throughout, Lieutenant Wilson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


Sergeant David Darrell Patten (Silver Star - 2Apr66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant David Darrell Patten (MCSN: 1977452), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 2 April 1966, during Operation ORANGE, Sergeant Patten was leading his squad through hostile territory near the village of Lap Thuan when, just before midnight, one of the fire teams was pinned down by concentrated Viet Cong automatic weapons fire. Reacting instantly, Sergeant Patten moved to the team's position and, with enemy rounds making a shower of dirt around him, stood beside his prone comrades to gain better observation and fire his M-79 grenade launcher into the enemy trench lines. His barrage of fire was so effective that the Viet Cong action subsided, enabling the Marines to gain fire superiority, overrun and eliminate the enemy position. Continuing on the original mission, the Marines again made contact with the Viet Cong. Sergeant Patten exhibited uncommon courage and disregard for his own safety when the point rifleman was wounded and became a target of concentrated fire. Undaunted by the murderous fire, Sergeant Patten unhesitatingly raced across about twenty meters of open ground to help his immobilized comrade. All the while shouting orders to the remainder of his unit, he quickly administered first aid and pulled the wounded Marine to safety. His valiant act undoubtedly saved the man from sustaining further wounds. By his extraordinary heroism in the face of extreme danger, daring initiative and unfaltering dedication to duty, Sergeant Patten upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Sergeant James L. Stickel (Silver Star - 2Apr66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James L. Stickel (MCSN: 2013516), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 2 April 1966, Sergeant Stickel volunteered to lead a patrol into an open rice paddy area near DaNang to search for Marines who had become casualties in the day's heavy action. Stealthily moving across the moonlit paddy, Sergeant Stickel skillfully maneuvered his men to within fifty meters of a heavily fortified treeline before they were observed and subjected to heavy mortar fire. Ordering the patrol to the relative safety of a rice paddy dike, he courageously moved forward alone, crawling to within twenty meters of the Viet Cong lines. After locating and carrying the body of one of the Marines back to his patrol's position, he fully exposed himself to the enemy fire to make two more trips forward to search for the missing Marines. He was returning to his position with the body of another casualty when intense hostile fire prevented further movement. Swiftly organizing the patrol, he directed the withdrawal to friendly lines, gallantly covering his men's movement until all had reached a position of safety. By his demonstrated courage in the face of enemy fire, bold initiative and unfaltering dedication to duty throughout, Sergeant Stickel upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


15Jul66  to  03Aug66                         HASTINGS


Corporal Don Winslow Allen (Silver Star - 15Jul66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Don Winslow Allen (MCSN: 2083773), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 15 July 1966. Corporal Allen was the point man on a combat patrol, north of Cam Lo, near the Task Force Delta Headquarters during Operation HASTINGS. Coming over the crest of a small hill, he observed the lead element of a twenty-four man North Vietnamese Army patrol moving along a trail toward the rest of his squad. The enemy was heavily armed with small arms, automatic weapons and 60-mm. mortars and outnumbered his squad two to one. Realizing that there was not enough time to deploy the entire patrol, he motioned the nearest two men into an ambush position and waited for the enemy to approach. Triggering the ambush with a burst of fire from his own weapon, he killed the first two North Vietnamese regulars in the column and placed heavy fire upon the rest. By this time, his patrol leader had deployed the remaining members of his squad and a heavy firefight ensued. When one enemy soldier attempted to escape, he rushed forward, knocking him down with his rifle and shot him. Retreating to a nearby hill, the enemy reorganized and began to fire their mortars. Undaunted, Corporal Allen pushed aggressively forward, searching the immediate area for additional enemy. Suddenly, a grenade exploded to his front, wounding him in the neck and leg. Despite his pain, he returned the fire and threw grenades at the enemy positions. Although a second enemy grenade exploded, wounding him in the face, he gallantly continued to bring fire on the enemy. Firing his weapon continuously, he moved, with the aid of the patrol leader, through a barrage of mortar shells to friendly positions. By his initiative, aggressiveness and courageous fighting spirit, Corporal Allen undoubtedly prevented a destructive enemy mortar attack on the Task Force Headquarters and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Private First Class Vincent Alfonso (Navy Cross -20Jul66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Private First Class Vincent Alfonso (MCSN: 1984618), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam. On 20 July 1966 near the Dong Ha airstrip, during Operation HASTINGS, Private First Class Alfonso was serving as a machine gunner with a twelve man patrol when the squad was ambushed while taking on water at a small stream by a force of about sixty Viet Cong. In a matter of minutes enemy fire hit the group from three sides and the squad leader directed a move to key high ground in the right rear with Private First Class Alfonso designated to cover their move. Because his field of vision was extremely limited in the high grass and scrub, he courageously leaped to his feet and provided effective fire while his companions made their way to the new position. When the enemy augmented their fire with several mortar rounds, he again stood in full view of the enemy and displayed extraordinary aggressiveness and courage as he fired two hundred rounds from the hip directly into the hostile position. As armed helicopters arrived over the scene and forced the Viet Cong from cover, he continued to pour heavy and accurate fire at the enemy. When dangerously low ammunition supplies and a lack of communications forced the Marines to start withdrawing, he again displayed daring initiative and fearlessness as he exposed himself to the continuing hostile fire to cover the movement of his comrades. His valiant effort throughout was largely responsible for the toll of thirty Viet Cong killed, and enabled his unit to escape from the hazardous area without sustaining any casualties. By his extraordinary courage in the face of overwhelming odds, uncommon concern for others at great risk of his own life, and unwavering dedication to duty, Private First Class Alfonso reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal Lawrence J. Brent (Silver Star - 20Jul66)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Lawrence J. Brent (MCSN: 2079230), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 20 July 1966, during Operation HASTINGS, Corporal Brent was serving as Patrol Leader of a twelve-man unit operating near the Dong Ha airstrip. While several of the Marines were obtaining water from a small stream, they were taken under attack by a force of about sixty Viet Cong. Exhibiting presence of mind in the emergency, Corporal Brent directed covering fire for the members of the water detail. Shortly thereafter, enemy fire intensified from three sides. Sensing that his squad was being enveloped from the left rear, Corporal Brent promptly deployed the machine gunner to cover the men and, without regard for his own safety, exposed himself to the hostile fire to direct the movement of his men to key high ground in the right rear. When two helicopters were approaching the area, he displayed remarkable resourcefulness in overcoming a failure in his radio equipment. After signaling to the aircraft by hurling red smoke grenades at the enemy and dropping green ones in his own perimeter, Corporal Brent courageously exposed himself to give hand and arm signals in the midst of hostile fire, which by this time had increased in volume and included several mortar rounds. The action of the helicopters forced the enemy from cover and enabled Corporal Brent and his men to account for thirty enemy dead. Realizing that the unit's low ammunition supply and lack of communications made prompt withdrawal necessary, Corporal Brent judiciously maneuvered his men from the hazardous area. His inspiring leadership and professionalism were instrumental in dealing heavy losses to the Viet Cong without sustaining Marine casualties. By his exceptional fortitude and composure in the face of extreme danger, coupled with unfaltering dedication to duty throughout, Corporal Brent upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Private First Class Steve Albert Srsen (Navy Cross Posthumously - 27Jan67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Private First Class Steve Albert Srsen (MCSN: 2196925), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Rifleman while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 27 January 1967. Private First Class Srsen was with the First Platoon, Company A, when it was engaged in action as a reaction force assigned to link up with a reconnaissance patrol. Early the next morning following the linkup, Private First Class Srsen's squad came under heavy small-arms fire and grenade attack. When an enemy grenade landed in his squad's position, Private First Class Srsen warned three other members of the squad, allowing them to take cover and escape injury. Wounded in his right side and leg from the grenade, Private First Class Srsen, after being treated by a Corpsman requested permission to return to his position in the perimeter. Approximately thirty minutes later another enemy grenade landed close to another Marine and Private First Class Srsen gallantly pushed him to the ground, thereby saving his life. Mortally wounded by the exploding grenade, Private First Class Srsen, by his dauntless courage and grave concern for another had risked his life to save that of a fellow Marine, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


28Apr67  to  12May67                       BEAVER CAGE (UNION)


Lance Corporal Melvin L. Allen (Silver Star Posthumously - 4May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Melvin L. Allen (MCSN: 2232029), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battalion Landing Team 1/3 in the Republic of Vietnam on 4 May 1967. As a fire Team Leader with the Third Platoon, Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, Lance Corporal Allen was on a search and destroy operation in Tinh Quang Nam Province during Operation BEAVER CAGE. The Third Platoon came upon an open area before reaching An Xuan village. The Third Squad, deployed on the right flank before moving to the village, was caught in the open and pinned down by heavy automatic weapons and accurate sniper fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force of company size, and sustained several casualties. Lance Corporal Allen, with full knowledge of the hazards involved and with complete disregard for his own safety, repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire in an attempt to aid the wounded Marines. He was mortally wounded on his fourth attempt. Lance Corporal Allen's daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of the enemy reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Private Glenn Joseph Blackburn (Silver Star - 4May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Glenn Joseph Blackburn (MCSN: 2160441), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade in connection with operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 4 May 1967, during Operation BEAVER CAGE, Company D was conducting a search and destroy mission near An Xuan village in Tinh Quang Nam Province when it suddenly came under intense fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force. In the ensuing engagement, the Third Platoon became pinned down by heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. While maneuvering to the assistance of the besieged unit, two squads from Private Blackburn's platoon were momentarily halted before establishing contact with the beleaguered unit, however his squad successfully reached the Third Platoon's position. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he aggressively moved through the area in search of enemy positions and, while assaulting a Viet Cong machine gun emplacement, sustained a serious shoulder wound. Pausing only to receive medical aid, he refused evacuation and steadfastly continued to engage the enemy with accurate rifle fire. Subsequently observing two wounded Marines lying in an open area, he unhesitatingly exposed himself to the heavy volume of hostile fire and, disregarding his painful injury, maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain to the side of the wounded man. While assisting one of the injured Marines to safety, Private Blackburn sustained a second wound from enemy fire and was unable to continue. His aggressive fighting spirit and fearless initiative were an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the enemy. By his inspiring courage, unwavering determination and selfless devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Private Blackburn upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Staff Sergeant Elpidio Allen Arquero (Navy Cross Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Elpidio Allen Arquero (MCSN: 1694536), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Platoon Sergeant, First Platoon, Company B, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, Ninth Amphibious Brigade, in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. While participating in Operation BEAVER CAGE in Tinh, Quang Nam Province, Staff Sergeant Arquero's platoon was lead unit in a company search and destroy operation, when heavy contact was made with two companies of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese regular forces. His flank security began receiving heavy automatic weapons fire and sustained several casualties. He immediately made his way to its position through the hail of enemy fire and courageously directed effective return fire. In order to provide much needed time for his platoon to deploy, he organized an assault element from the remaining members of his flank security. By this time the enemy fire power had increased in severity and effectiveness, yet he daringly continued to expose himself. Without concern for his own safety, he rallied his brave assault force and charged directly into the entrenched enemy positions. This action, which cost him his life, halted the advance of the enemy long enough to allow his platoon time to extract its wounded and withdraw to a defensible position. As a result of his heroic conduct and fearless devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Arquero undoubtedly saved the lives of many comrades, upholding the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Private First Class Thomas L. Foy (Silver Star Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Thomas L. Foy (MCSN: 2277787), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman in the First Platoon, Company B, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, during Operation BEAVER CAGE in Tinh Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 10 May 1967. Private Foy's squad was providing right-flank security for his platoon on a company search and destroy operation when heavy contact was made with two companies of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Regular forces. In order for his platoon to have time to deploy effectively, face the enemy, and extricate its casualties, Private First Class Foy courageously remained at his position, delivering effective fire through the hail of automatic weapons, small-arms, and mortar fire, causing many casualties and creating much confusion among the enemy. Mortally wounded during this action, Private First Class Foy, by his fearless conduct, courage and devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Private First Class Russell P. Miller (Silver Star Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Russell P. Miller (MCSN: 2322957), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company D, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Tinh Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. During Operation BEAVER CAGE, Private First Class Miller's squad was providing flank security for his platoon when they were taken under devastating automatic weapons, small-arms and mortar fire from an estimated two companies of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Regulars. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire to place effective fire upon the enemy positions. Again, with complete disregard for his own safety, he and a fellow Marine assaulted the entrenched enemy positions. Although mortally wounded during this valiant attempt, he was instrumental in gaining time to evacuate the wounded and allowing his platoon to establish defensive positions. By his bold initiative, gallant fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Private First Class Miller reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Private First Class James C. Riley (Silver Star Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class James C. Riley (MCSN: 2278227), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman in the First Platoon, Company B, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, during Operation BEAVER CAGE, in Tinh Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 10 May 1967. Private First Class Riley's squad was providing flank security for his platoon during a company search and destroy operation when heavy contact was made with two companies of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese regular forces. Though his squad received heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire, sustaining several casualties, Private First Class Riley immediately braved the intense fire to place effective fire on the enemy. He then fearlessly joined his Platoon Sergeant in a heroic assault directly into the entrenched enemy position. His courageous actions allowed his platoon much needed time to deploy to face the enemy and extricate its casualties. Mortally wounded during this action, Private First Class Riley, by his aggressiveness and coolness under fire undoubtedly saved the lives of many Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Corporal Sterling S. Woods (Silver Star Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Sterling S. Woods (MCSN: 2101086), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader with Company B, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, THIRD Marine Division, in Tinh Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. During Operation Beaver Cage Corporal Woods' squad was providing right flank security for his platoon when they were taken under devastating automatic, small-arms and mortar fire from an estimated two companies of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese regulars. As the enemy assaulted the Marine position, he steadfastly stood his ground, in the intense enemy fire, to enable his platoon. He remained in his precarious position, causing many enemy casualties, until he was mortally wounded. By his bold initiative, dauntless courage and selfless devotion to duty, he was instrumental in saving numerous Marines from further injury or possible death, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Corporal John Michael Reid (Navy Cross Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Corporal John Michael Reid (MCSN: 2145615), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Rifle Squad Leader while serving with Company C, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, III Marine Amphibious Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. While participating in Operation BEAVER CAGE, Corporal Reid's platoon became heavily engaged in combat with a Viet Cong and North Vietnamese troop unit and was receiving casualties from enemy automatic weapons, small arms and mortar fire. One machine gun team was placed completely out of action by enemy mortars. Seeing that enemy fire had his platoon pinned down in exposed positions, he unhesitatingly moved across open ground to the machine gun, seized it and advanced another 20 to 30 meters. Being forced down several times during this maneuver, he reached his new position and delivered a heavy volume of accurate fire on the enemy positions, temporarily halting their fire, which allowed six other members of his squad to gain a covered position. Corporal Reid continued firing the machine gun from the exposed position in the rice paddy to thwart the advance of enemy troops attempting to overrun his platoon and endanger the Company's flank. While in his exposed position, Corporal Reid was wounded in the leg by rifle fire and as he moved forward to gain cover, he was hit again and mortally wounded. By his daring action and devotion to duty, Corporal Reid gave his life to save those of his fellow Marines, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Corporal Thomas Sanders (Navy Cross Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Corporal Thomas Sanders (MCSN: 2169627), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Machine Gun Squad Leader with Company C, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. While participating in Operation BEAVER CAGE, in Tinh, Quang Nam Province, Corporal Sanders enabled his platoon to move from positions exposed to heavy automatic and small arms fire, to a protected trench line, by advancing himself to an exposed position with his squad's machine gun when all other members of the squad became casualties. He then placed a heavy volume of accurate fire on Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army troops causing them to cease fire. When the enemy troops advanced to the cover of the trench line, in which other members of his platoon were located, he placed himself between the enemy and friendly troops. As the enemy approached to within six meters in front of him, Corporal Sanders delivered machine gun fire down the long axis of the trench line killing approximately two of them and wounding three others before he was killed by enemy fire. As a result of his heroic conduct and fearless devotion to duty, his actions enabled nine Marines, some of whom were wounded, to gain cover in the trench line and to gain positions where grenades and M-79 fire could be delivered on the enemy. By his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and valiant fighting spirit, Corporal Sanders served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


First Lieutenant Richard Earl Chapa (Silver Star - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Richard Earl Chapa (MCSN: 0-93882), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 10 May 1967, during Operation BEAVER CAGE, First Lieutenant Chapa's platoon was moving to the assistance of another Marine unit which was heavily engaged with an enemy force. As he attempted to envelop the enemy from the left flank, his unit came under intense automatic weapons and mortar fire. Skillfully leading his men, First Lieutenant Chapa succeeded in reaching a trench line used by the enemy to maneuver against the Marines. Displaying exceptional leadership and bold initiative, he moved from the trench line to an unprotected position from which he delivered accurate M-79 grenade and rifle fire at the hostile force, halting the enemy's advance. Although wounded in the hand, he returned to the trench line, obtained several hand grenades and again moved to a vantage point where he prevented a second attempt by the enemy to overrun his position. Although he was wounded again by mortar fragments, First Lieutenant Chapa quickly organized his men and aggressively led them in an assault which forced the enemy to flee from their positions. Subsequently, he assisted in recovering three mortally wounded Marines and their equipment from an open rice paddy. His determination and aggressive fighting spirit were instrumental in the defeat of the enemy and were an inspiration to all who served with him. By his steadfast courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Chapa upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Second Lieutenant Joseph T. McKeon Jr. (Silver Star Posthumously - 10May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Joseph T. McKeon, Jr. (MCSN: 0-94899), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Platoon Leader, First Platoon, Company B, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, 9th Marines Amphibious Brigade during Operation Beaver Cage in Tinh Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. Second Lieutenant McKeon's platoon was the lead right platoon of Company B on a search and destroy operation when they made heavy contact with an estimated two companies of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Regular forces. Though all flank security immediately became casualties from heavy automatic weapons, small arms, and mortar fire, he immediately and with inspiring courage, began to maneuver his platoon to face the enemy. During this action, he exposed himself many times to deadly enemy fire with complete disregard for his own safety. Upon deploying his platoon, he began directing effective fire on the enemy positions, then he personally led a rescue party onto the battlefield to recover his casualties. Though the battle continued for more then ten hours, Second Lieutenant McKeon continued to successfully lead his platoon with great professional skill until the enemy was driven from the position. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Second Lieutenant McKeon served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


18May67  to  26May67                      HICKORY / BEAU CHARGER


Corporal Russell Forrest Keck (Navy Cross Posthumously - 18May67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Corporal Russell Forrest Keck (MCSN: 2201914), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader with Company A, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 May 1967. During Operation BEAU CHARGER, in Quang Tin Province, Corporal Keck's squad was landed by helicopter into a heavily defended enemy position. Due to the large volume of intense enemy ground fire, the helicopters were forced to disperse over a wide area, causing the isolation of many small units. Finding himself and his gun team separated from the main body of his company, Corporal Keck quickly placed his guns into action. Observing one machine gun within hand grenade range of the teeming enemy trench lines, he rushed to the aid of his men under vicious enemy fire, finding one lone survivor. He quickly evaluated the situation and decided to move the gun to a safer position to keep it in action. While breaking the gun down into two groups, he was wounded by an enemy grenade. Disregarding his painful wounds, he quickly killed the enemy soldier who had thrown the grenade with an accurate burst of machine gun fire. Realizing that only one man could possibly make it back across the deadly fire-swept terrain, Corporal Keck ordered his gunner to return, while he gave covering fire. During this unselfish action, he was mortally wounded. By his courageous actions, bold initiative, intrepid fighting spirit and sincere concern for others, Corporal Keck reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


03Jul67  to  13Jul67                            BEAR CLAW / BUFFALO


Lieutenant Colonel Peter Allen Wickwire (Silver Star - 6Jul67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Peter Allen Wickwire (MCSN: 0-51969), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as the Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Third Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Force, in connection with combat operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 6 July 1967, while Lieutenant Colonel Wickwire's battalion was deployed in defensive positions in the vicinity of Hoa Son in Quang Tri Province, it came under intense enemy artillery and mortar fire followed by a large infantry assault. With artillery rounds exploding within a few feet of his open trench position and the enemy infantry advancing, Lieutenant Colonel Wickwire remained composed and decisive, instilling confidence in his officers and men. Displaying the highest degree of military proficiency, he coordinated all friendly defensive supporting arms fire, provided expert direction and encouragement to his company commanders, radioed situation reports to higher headquarters and supervised the formation of a reaction force to blunt any enemy penetration of his position. When, after an hour and a half of heavy artillery bombardment, his position was penetrated by enemy assault troops, Lieutenant Colonel Wickwire unhesitatingly committed his reaction force and restored the perimeter line. Simultaneously, as the enemy threatened the movement of a platoon size Marine combat patrol from a company into the battalion perimeter, he skillfully directed a screen of protective artillery fire which decimated the advancing enemy and permitted the exposed unit to reach safety. Throughout the four-hour engagement, Lieutenant Colonel Wickwire constantly disregarded his own safety to control the activities of his ground forces and direct supporting fires. Under his dynamic leadership, his men thwarted the enemy's attempt to overrun the battalion's position and killed 200 enemy soldiers while sustaining minimum friendly casualties. His bold initiative and expert employment of military tactics inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in the overwhelming defeat of the aggressive enemy force. By his extraordinary determination, resolute courage and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Lieutenant Colonel Wickwire upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Captain Burrell H. Landes Jr. (Silver Star - 6Jul67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Burrell H. Landes, Jr. (MCSN: 0-79715), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 6 July 1967, during Operation BUFFALO, Captain Landes' battalion was occupying a defensive perimeter at Hao Son in Quang Tri Province when the Marines suddenly came under intense enemy artillery and rocket fire supporting a determined ground attack by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Realizing that the enemy had succeeded in penetrating the perimeter between his company and an adjacent unit, Captain Landes quickly organized a squad into a reaction force and maneuvered his men against the hostile flank while skillfully directing their fire against the enemy. Observing a North Vietnamese soldier maneuvering toward his position, he quickly seized a radio operator's rifle and killed the hostile soldier. Displaying exceptional leadership and tactical skill, he aggressively directed the holding action of his greatly outnumbered squad until elements of a reserve company arrived to reinforce his position at the point of penetration. His heroic and timely actions were highly instrumental in blunting the hostile attack and preventing the enemy from overrunning his perimeter. By his courage, superb leadership and unfaltering devotion to duty at great personal risk, Captain Landes upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


11Aug67  to 29Aug67                                    COCHISE


Sergeant John H. Jones (Silver Star Posthumously - 16Aug67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant John H. Jones (MCSN: 2152507), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, during Operation COCHISE, in Quang Tin Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 16 August 1967. Sergeant Jones' squad was advancing across open rice paddies toward a tree line designated as a platoon intermediate objective. When the tree line was thirty meters distant, the six-man squad was enveloped in a withering volley of small-arms and automatic weapons fire, inflicting immediate casualties on three of his men. Finding that his radio was smashed by the enemy fire, Sergeant Jones sent two men back to bring aid and relay his situation while he remained to offer covering fire. After marking one machine-gun bunker with smoke, in the face of certain death and with complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Jones unhesitatingly crawled forward to give aid and assistance to one of his wounded comrades, and was mortally wounded. As a result of his actions, a relief force was able to recover all of the wounded Marines and destroy the machine-gun position he had previously marked. Sergeant Jones gallantly sacrificed his own life in an attempt to safe the lives of his men while continuing to carry out his mission. Sergeant Jones' actions reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Lance Corporal George Thomas Canney (Silver Star -17Aug67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lance Corporal George Thomas Canney (MCSN: 2266543), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company B, First Battalion, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. In the early morning hours of 17 August 1967, during Operation BEACON GATE/COCHISE in Quang Tin Province, Lance Corporal Canney's squad was defending a combat outpost which was suddenly assaulted by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Disregarding his own safety, Lance Corporal Canney repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to throw grenades and deliver accurate suppressive fire at the enemy. When his unit withdrew to a covered position on the reverse slope of the hill, he fearlessly remained in his dangerously exposed position to provide covering fire for the evacuation of the wounded. Then, assured that his wounded companions were safe, Lance Corporal Canney joined four other Marines in an aggressive counterattack against the enemy. Despite the heavy volume of hostile fire, the Marines overran the enemy positions, inflicting heavy casualties and forcing the North Vietnamese to abandon their dead comrades and flee in panic and confusion. His resolute determination and sincere concern for the welfare of his fellow Marines inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of several Marines. By his courage at great personal risk, Lance Corporal Canney upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Lance Corporal Shalor Copeland II (Silver Star - 17Aug67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lance Corporal Shalor Copeland, II (MCSN: 2307499), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Machine Gunner with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 17 August 1967, during Operation BEACON GATE/COCHISE in Quang Tin Province, Lance Corporal Copeland's squad was defending a combat outpost when it was suddenly assaulted by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Disregarding his own safety, Lance Corporal Copeland repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to deliver a heavy volume of machine gun fire at the enemy. In the ensuing engagement, an enemy grenade exploded in his position, killing the machine gun team leader and wounding two other Marines, including Lance Corporal Copeland. Subsequently, the perimeter was penetrated and the Marines evacuated their casualties to a covered position on the reverse slope of the hill. Despite his painful injuries, Lance Corporal Copeland steadfastly picked up his wounded companion and his machine gun and began moving across the fire-swept terrain. En route to the secondary position, he encountered eight enemy soldiers and killed them with accurate machine gun fire. His resolute determination and sincere concern for the welfare of his comrade inspired all who observed him and saved the life of the wounded Marine. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Lance Corporal Copeland upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Staff Sergeant William Henry Head Jr. (Silver Star - 17Aug67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant William Henry Head, Jr. (MCSN: 1973115), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, 9th Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 17 August 1967, during Operation BEACON GATE/COCHISE, Staff Sergeant Head was in command of a reinforced squad defending a combat outpost in Quang Tin Province. In the early morning hours, the Marines were suddenly attacked by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force which had advanced dangerously close to the friendly lines. As the attack commenced, Staff Sergeant Head alerted his squad and fearlessly moved to a vantage point from which he could more effectively direct their fire. In the ensuing engagement, the squad sustained numerous casualties and its perimeter was penetrated by the attacking force. Realizing that his position was untenable and that there were numerous men wounded, Staff Sergeant Head threw several grenades at the enemy while simultaneously directing his men to evacuate the wounded to covered positions on the reverse slope of the hill. Then, assured that his injured Marines were safe, he returned to the top of the hill with two men, rallied two additional Marines and skillfully launched an aggressive counterattack. Under his determined leadership, the Marines overran the enemy positions, inflicting heavy casualties and forcing the North Vietnamese to abandon their dead comrades and flee in panic and confusion. His superb imitative and professionalism were instrumental in the defeat of a large enemy force and undoubtedly saved the lives of several Marines. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Staff Sergeant Head inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Private First Class Paul Michael Julian (Silver Star - 17Aug67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Paul Michael Julian (MCSN: 2225280), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, 9th Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. In the early morning hours of 17 August 1967, during Operation BEACON GATE/COCHISE in Quang Tin Province, Private First Class Julian's squad was defending a combat outpost which was suddenly assaulted by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Disregarding his own safety, Private First Class Julian repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to throw grenades and deliver accurate suppressive fire at the enemy. When his unit withdrew to a covered position on the reverse slope of the hill, he fearlessly remained in his dangerously exposed position to provide covering fire for the evacuation of the wounded. Then, assured that his wounded companions were safe, Private First Class Julian joined four other Marines in an aggressive counterattack against the enemy. Despite the heavy volume of hostile fire, the Marines overran the enemy positions, inflicting heavy casualties and forcing the North Vietnamese soldiers to abandon their dead comrades and flee in panic and confusion. His resolute determination and sincere concern for the welfare of his fellow Marines inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of several Marines. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty at great personal risk, Private First Class Julian upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


10Oct67  to  20Oct67                         BASTION HILL / MEDINA


Captain William Henry Neuss  (Silver Star Posthumously - 11Oct67)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain [then First Lieutenant] William Henry Neuss (MCSN: 0-92447), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Executive Officer of Company C, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam on 11 October 1967. When a large force of North Vietnamese Regulars broke through a portion of his company perimeter, Captain Neuss quickly organized a reaction force from within the company command party to counterattack and reestablish the original line of defense. The enemy force had reached a sector of high ground and was bringing heavy machine gun and automatic weapons fire to bear on the company command post. Captain Neuss was wounded in the hand in the initial burst, but with complete disregard for his own safety and his painful wound, he boldly charged toward the enemy force, firing his pistol and leading his small reaction force, until fatally wounded by enemy machine gun fire. As a result of his decisive leadership the enemy was halted and soon pushed out of the perimeter. By his daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk, Captain Neuss upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Captain Eugene B. Burleson Jr. (Silver Star - 11Oct67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Eugene B. Burleson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-76404), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. In the early morning hours of 11 October 1967, Captain Burleson's company was attacked by a large North Vietnamese Army force. Throwing satchel charges and firing automatic weapons, the enemy soldiers penetrated the Marine lines, advanced to a small hill within the perimeter and directed intense machine gun fire into the enemy command post. The initial bursts of fire wounded Captain Burleson twice and killed his executive officer and one platoon commander. In addition, the 81-mm. Mortar Platoon and the adjacent company's right flank came under enemy fire from the commanding terrain. Refusing medical aid, Captain Burleson quickly led his command group to a covered position and skillfully deployed his reaction force in an aggressive counterattack against the enemy, while simultaneously directing supporting arms fire on the advancing North Vietnamese. Only after the hostile force had been repelled and all Marine casualties had been evacuated did he relinquish his command to a relieving officer and allow himself to be evacuated. His calm professionalism and determined efforts were an inspiration to all who served with him and resulted in eight North Vietnamese soldiers confirmed killed and three captured. By his courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Captain Burleson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal Stephen A. Fanter (Silver Star - 11Oct67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Stephen A. Fanter (MCSN: 2250623), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Company C Driver and Interpreter, Battalion Landing Team First Battalion Third Marines (BLT 1/3), Special Landing Force Alpha, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. During the dark morning our of 11 October 1967, while in blocking positions west of Highway 1 during Operation MEDINA, Corporal Fanter was with the Command Group when the Company came under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire when a North Vietnamese Army assault force penetrated Company C positions. Under a heavy volume of accurate enemy fire, Corporal Fanter moved forward along the ridgeline firing his M-16 rifle into the advancing North Vietnamese Army even though wounded in the initial assault. He continued to attack enemy with rifle fire and hand grenades even though seriously wounded again three more times. Unable to continue and defend and seriously wounded, Corporal Fanter was hit a fifth time by enemy fire while being carried to higher ground by another Marine. His courageous actions and resolute determination contributed significantly to stopping the North Vietnamese Army attack short of the BLT Command Post. By his courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Corporal Fanter reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


06Nov67  to 16Nov67                        KENTUCKY


Corporal Donald R. North Jr. (Silver Star - 11Nov67)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Donald R. North, Jr. (MCSN: 2226598), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 11 November 1967, while conducting a search and destroy operation in an enemy-infested sector northeast of Con Thien during Operation KENTUCKY V, Company D came under intense enemy fire from a hostile force entrenched in a well-concealed bunker complex. During the ensuing fire fight, Corporal North repeatedly disregarded his own safety to gain vantage points from which to fire at the enemy. Alertly pinpointing a bunker which was inflicting casualties on his platoon, he began to crawl across the fire-swept terrain toward the hostile position. Although an enemy round hit and damaged his rifle, he remained calm and continued to advance until he reached the bunker. In full view of the enemy, Corporal North climbed on top of the bunker and, throwing a grenade into the aperture, destroyed the weapons and killed all four occupants. His bold actions inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of two Marines who were pinned down in the open. By his initiative, extraordinary courage, and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal North upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


29Nov67  to  29Dec67                       KENTUCKY V


Second Lieutenant Ralph Shoup Gorton III (Silver Star Posthumously - from 28Dec67 to 27May68 - KIA at Dia Do area)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Ralph Shoup Gorton, III (MCSN: 0-103511), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam from 28 December 1967 to 27 May 1968. Throughout this period, Second Lieutenant Gorton displayed exceptional professionalism and leadership in the performance of his duties. Initially assigned as Weapons Platoon Commander, he accomplished all assigned tasks in a highly competent manner. Reassigned as a Rifle Platoon Commander on 27 January 1968, he ably led his men during five major combat operations including Operations Kentucky, Jeb Stuart and Napoleon/Saline. On 7 March 1968, during an attack against a heavily fortified village, Second Lieutenant Gorton aggressively maneuvered his unit in the face of intense enemy fire and, overcoming determined enemy resistance, was instrumental in seizing the objective. During a subsequent operation on 5 May, when elements of his company became engaged with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force, Second Lieutenant Gorton was assigned the mission of reinforcing his unit's left flank position. Unhesitatingly moving to the point of heaviest contact, he skillfully maneuvered his platoon into position and although the hostile force launched a fierce counterattack, repeatedly disregarded his own safety as he exposed himself to enemy fire in order to observe and identify hostile positions for his men. Under his aggressive leadership, his platoon inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy and contributed immeasurably to the success of the operation. When his unit became pinned down by intense small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire during an assault on the village of Phu Con on 27 May, Second Lieutenant Gorton unhesitatingly moved from one position to another, encouraging his men and directing their fire. As he was maneuvering across the fire-swept terrain to deploy his point squad, he was killed by the enemy fire. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty throughout, Second Lieutenant Groton upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country


30Dec67  to  12Feb68                                    NAPOLEON


Captain William H. Osgood (Silver Star -19Jan68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain William H. Osgood (MCSN: 0-79937), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 19 January 1968, Captain Osgood was informed that one of his platoons was pinned down by heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire 3,000 meters north of the company perimeter near Gio Dinh in Quang Tri Province. Quickly organizing a reaction force, Captain Osgood loaded his men aboard tanks and proceeded to the besieged Marines' position. Undaunted by a heavy volume of mortar fire as he approached the battle area, he skillfully deployed his forces and launched an aggressive attack against the enemy. Repeatedly exposing himself to intense enemy fire, he led his men forward and destroyed a bunker complex, over-running the enemy's right flank and enabling the pinned-down Marines to recover their casualties and move to more advantageous positions. Throughout the six hour engagement in which twenty-three North Vietnamese soldiers were confirmed killed and numerous weapons captured, Captain Osgood repeatedly disregarded his own safety to direct fire against the enemy, encourage his men and supervise the evacuation of casualties. As he withdrew his units from the battle area and led them to the security of the company perimeter, he directed effective artillery fire and air strikes against the fleeing enemy. His timely and courageous actions at great personal risk undoubtedly saved numerous Marine lives and contributed significantly to the defeat of the hostile force. By his inspiring leadership, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Captain Osgood upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Sergeant Clyde L. Bonnelycke (Silver Star - 19Jan68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Navy Award) to Sergeant Clyde L. Bonnelycke (MCSN: 1806071/ASN: 1806021), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 19 January 1968, Sergeant Bonnelycke's platoon was assigned to assist a friendly unit which had become heavily engaged with numerically superior enemy force north of the Cua Viet River in Quang Tri Province. Upon reaching the unit, the Marines became pinned down by a heavy volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire from numerous fortified hostile positions. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Sergeant Bonnelycke unhesitatingly exposed himself to the intense fire and fearlessly maneuvered across twenty-five meters of fire-swept terrain toward an enemy bunker. Upon reaching the hostile emplacement, he boldly threw a hand grenade into it, silencing the enemy fire and enabling his unit to continue its attack. His heroic actions and determined efforts inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in his unit accounting for twenty-three enemy soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Sergeant Bonnelycke contributed immeasurably to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


Lance Corporal Donald Lemonye Hazen (Silver Star - 19Jan68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lance Corporal Donald Lemonye Hazen (MCSN: 2353111), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 19 January 1968, Lance Corporal Hazen's unit was assigned to aid a friendly unit that was pinned down by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force near the Cua Viet River in Quang Tri Province. As the Marines approached the beleaguered unit, they suddenly came under intense hostile fire which impeded their advance. Reacting instantly, Lance Corporal Hazen moved forward to provide suppressive fire with his M-60 machine gun. Alertly observing an enemy bunker, he fearlessly maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain, firing his weapon and killing the enemy soldier. Receiving intense fire from another position, Lance Corporal Hazen immediately crawled across the dangerously exposed terrain, and as an enemy soldier tried to seize his M-60 machine gun, he killed the man. Pinpointing another hostile emplacement, he boldly moved forward of his unit and threw a hand grenade into the bunker, killing two additional North Vietnamese soldiers. His heroic and timely actions were instrumental in the accomplishment of his unit's mission and inspired all who observed him. By his courage, resolute determination and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Lance Corporal Hazen upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal James Louis Tubbs Jr. (Silver Star - 22Jan68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure  in presenting the Silver Star  to Corporal James Louis Tubbs, Jr. (MCSN: 2226985), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, in connection with military operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 22 January 1968, during a patrol near an outpost north of the Cua Viet River, Corporal Tubbs volunteered to serve as point man for a squad assigned to move across a large open area and reconnoiter a tree line. As the Marines neared the objective, they suddenly came under intense automatic weapons and small arms fire. Alertly observing a North Vietnamese soldier preparing to direct machine gun fire at a friendly position, Corporal Tubbs killed him with an accurate burst of rifle fire. During the ensuing fire fight, he repeatedly disregarded his own safety to locate and destroy hostile positions. On one occasion, he threw a hand grenade directly into an enemy bunker, effectively silencing the hostile fire from the emplacement. When a Marine was rendered unconscious by an exploding grenade, Corporal Tubbs aggressively moved forward and pinned down the enemy with accurate fire, killing two more hostile soldiers, while several Marines advanced and evacuated the wounded man. As his squad withdrew across 100 meters of open terrain, Corporal Tubbs continuously exposed himself to enemy fire in order to provide effective covering fire for his companions. His heroic actions were instrumental in saving the life of a fellow Marine and in his unit accounting for eight North Vietnamese soldiers killed. By his extraordinary courage, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Corporal Tubbs upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


01Mar68  to  03Jun68                         NAPOLEON / SALINE


Lance Corporal Abraham R. Derryberry III (Silver Star Posthumously - 5Mar68)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Abraham R. Derryberry, III (MCSN: 2259201), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. Late on the afternoon of 5 March 1968 during Operation Napoleon/Saline, the lead platoon of Company A was participating in a company-size search and clear mission near the village of Dai Do in Quang Tri Province when the unit came under heavy enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, wounding several Marines and pinning down the remainder of the platoon. Rapidly assessing the situation, Lance Corporal Derryberry provided covering fire which enabled a corpsman to move across the fire-swept area to reach the injured men and administer first aid. Then, ignoring the heavy volume of hostile fire, he led a fire team across the hazardous area to carry a resupply of ammunition to the platoon, advancing under intense fire to the most forward position. Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire, he carried the casualties to safety, refusing to leave the battle area until he ensured that all the wounded had been moved to covered positions. Subsequently, when his company was engaged in another search and clear mission on 7 March near the village of Phu Ta, the Marines suddenly came under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from an estimated two North Vietnamese Army companies. During the assault against the village, Lance Corporal Derryberry was mortally wounded. By his courage, inspiring leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Derryberry upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Lance Corporal William H. Young (Navy Cross - 7Mar68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lance Corporal William H. Young, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Radio Operator with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 7 March 1968, while advancing toward the village of Phu Tai in Quang Tri Province, Company A came under intense automatic weapons and mortar fire from a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force concealed in fortified bunkers. Although the Marines were pinned down in an open rice paddy, where any movement away from the protection afforded by the small dikes might mean almost certain death or serious injury, Corporal Young ignored the rounds impacting near him and fearlessly moved to positions from which he could effectively control air strikes on the enemy emplacements. When friendly casualties increased, he again disregarded his own safety as he unhesitatingly maneuvered forward and directed the evacuation of the wounded to a helicopter landing zone which he had established. During a subsequent assault on the village, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire in order to coordinate and control the fire of supporting helicopter gunships. As the Marines moved through the hazardous area, an enemy soldier suddenly ran out of a nearby bunker and prepared to fire directly at the advancing command group. Shouting a warning to his comrades, Corporal Young boldly assaulted the North Vietnamese, killing him with accurate pistol fire. Although he was later wounded in the chest and leg by sniper fire and moved to a covered position, he ignored his painful injuries and continued to coordinate vital air support for approximately three hours. His heroic and selfless actions inspired all who observed him. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Corporal Young contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


Captain David Hancock (Silver Star - 7Mar68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain David Hancock (MCSN: 0-83348), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer, Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 7 March 1968, Captain Hancock's unit was assigned the mission to attack an enemy force suspected to be occupying the village of Phu Tai in Quang Tri Province. As the Marines advanced to within seventy-five meters from the village, they came under intense automatic weapons fire from a large North Vietnamese Army force entrenched along a 300 meter front. Unable to maneuver his unit due to the heavy fire, he requested artillery fire and close air support to dislodge the well entrenched enemy and suppress their fire. After several hours of supporting fire, he realized darkness was rapidly approaching and ordered his men to assault the village. With complete disregard for his own safety, he maneuvered forward to his pinned-down lead elements and standing in full view of the enemy, rallied his men for the assault. Armed only with a .45 caliber pistol, he fearlessly led his men across the fire-swept terrain and into the village. While maneuvering through the area, he was wounded by an exploding grenade and knocked into an enemy-occupied trench. When a North Vietnamese soldier attacked him with a knife, Captain Hancock killed him at a range of less then three feet. Disregarding his painful injury, he continued to direct his unit and seized the village. Then, establishing a defensive perimeter, he moved among his men throughout the night, encouraging the wounded while refusing aid for himself. Due to his inspiring leadership and aggressive action, the Marines accounted for twenty-seven enemy confirmed killed and seized numerous individual and crew-served weapons. By his courage, unfaltering determination and steadfast devotion to duty, Captain Hancock upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Staff Sergeant Robert G. Robinson (Silver Star - 7Mar68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Robert G. Robinson (MCSN: 2006274), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Guide with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 7 March 1968, during Operation SALINA II, Sergeant Robinson's unit was moving toward the village of Phu Tai in Quang Tri Province when the Marines suddenly came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire and sustained several casualties, including a squad leader. Reacting instantly, Sergeant Robinson took charge of the squad and aggressively maneuvered his men forward until he was wounded. Ignoring his painful injury, he crawled to the squad's radio and skillfully directed supporting artillery fire and armed UH-1E helicopter strafing runs on the hostile emplacements. When his squad became dangerously low of ammunition, he fearlessly crawled across the fire-swept terrain and obtained additional ordinance. Returning to his squad's position, he maneuvered from one position to another, distributing ammunition and directing his men's fire. Despite his wounds, he resolutely controlled his men for an additional two hours until the seriousness of his injuries required that he submit to medical evacuation. By his courage, superb leadership, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Sergeant Robinson contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


30Apr68          AWARDED the SILVER STAR Co: B GYSGT Robert ROBINSON

                        (Citation) Unable to Locate!


Private First Class Jerry Ector (Silver Star Posthumously - 5Jul68)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Jerry Ector (MCSN: 2406562), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam./ On 5 July 1968, elements of Company C came under intense mortar and automatic weapons fire from a well entrenched North Vietnamese Army force in Quang Tri Province. Completely disregarding his own safety, Private First Class Ector repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire as he led his men in an attack on the enemy positions. When enemy hand grenades wounded the members of a machine gun team, he aggressively led an assault on the concealed enemy bunkers and sustained a painful injury. Ignoring his wounds, he boldly continued to direct the fire of his squad as he crawled toward the North Vietnamese position, subsequently accounting for four enemy soldiers killed and enabling his platoon to continue its advance. While attempting to destroy a North Vietnamese machine gun emplacement, Private First Class Ector was killed by the hostile fire. His selfless and heroic actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in the accomplishment of his unit's mission. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Ector upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


04Jul68  to  08Jul68                            JONES CREEK AREA, THIRD MARINES


First Lieutenant Thomas Roger Keppen (Silver Star - 6Jul68)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Thomas Roger Keppen (MCSN: 0-103608), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 6 July 1968, Company B was heavily engaged with a large North Vietnamese Army force entrenched in fortified positions near the village of Lai An in Quang Tri Province. Assigned to lead the attack on the hostile force, First Lieutenant Keppen skillfully maneuvered his platoon to within 200 meters of the enemy and immediately came under intense mortar and automatic weapons fire. Disregarding his own safety, he moved throughout the hazardous area encouraging his men and directing their fire. After adjusting supporting artillery fire on the enemy, First Lieutenant Keppen courageously led his men in a determined assault on the North Vietnamese, seizing the objective and forcing the enemy to flee. Largely due to his presence of mind under fire and superb tactical ability, his platoon accounted for thirty-two North Vietnamese soldiers killed while only three Marines were wounded. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Keppen inspired all who served with him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


6Aug68  to  24Aug68             LANCASTER II / JUPITER


Private First Class James R Heeter (Silver Star Posthumously -18Aug68)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class James R. Heeter (MCSN: 2374329), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, Third Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 18 August 1968, Private First Class Heeter's platoon was moving as the point element for the company during a patrol near Cam Lo where large enemy supply caches and troop concentrations were known to exist. When the lead squad suddenly came under intense automatic weapons fire from a large enemy force, isolating it from the remainder of the company, Private First Class Heeter completely disregarded his own safety and maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain to the beleaguered unit's position. Ignoring the heavy volume of hostile fire, he advanced to the side of a wounded Marine and quickly administered first aid. Although seriously wounded by enemy fire, he steadfastly remained in the exposed area with his injured comrade, and while continuing to provide vital medical treatment, Private First Class Heeter was mortally wounded. By his courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Heeter inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.


Corporal Michael L. Bolton (Silver Star - 18Aug68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Michael L. Bolton (MCSN: 2235185), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Combat Engineer attached to Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 18 August 1968, Company D's point squad came under intense North Vietnamese automatic weapons and machine gun fire while on patrol northwest of Cam Lo in Quang Tri Province and was pinned down. Rapidly assessing the situation, Corporal Bolton completely disregarded his own safety as he unhesitatingly left the command group and ran across the fire-swept terrain to reach the beleaguered squad. Alertly observing a hostile rounds impacting near him, he boldly re-crossed the hazardous area and, when the platoon sergeant was wounded, skillfully deployed the unit's machine guns to effective firing positions. Returning across the open terrain, he again braved the North Vietnamese fire as he aggressively assaulted two other enemy positions and succeeded in silencing the hostile fire. Continuing to ignore the enemy fire, he then assisted in administering first aid to the wounded and moving the squad to a more secure position. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving many of his fellow Marines from further injury or possible death. By his courage, bold initiative and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Corporal Bolton upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


01Sep68  to  05Nov68                        LANCASTER II


Corporal Donald A. Campbell (Silver Star Posthumously - 9Sep68)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Donald A. Campbell (MCSN: 2128722), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 9 September 1968, Company B was assigned to seize Hill 461 in the vicinity of the Rockpile in Quang Tri Province. Leading his squad as point element for the company, Corporal Campbell and his men suddenly came under intense automatic weapons and small arms fire from a large North Vietnamese Army force occupying well fortified positions. Realizing the necessity of rapidly gaining fire superiority and silencing the enemy fire, Corporal Campbell boldly stood erect and assaulted a bunker containing a machine gun. Undaunted by the accurate hostile fire, he resolutely continued his determined efforts, throwing hand grenades with unerring accuracy and silenced the hostile fire. While engaged in his selfless act, Corporal Campbell was mortally wounded. His heroic actions and aggressive fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and saved the lives of several Marines. By his courage, bold initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Campbell upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Hospitalman Second Class Petty Officer Alan C. James (Navy Cross - 9Sep68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Hospitalman Second Class Alan C. James (NSN: 7894913), United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism on 9 September 1968 while serving as senior Corpsman with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Company B commenced an aggressive assault against a North Vietnamese Army battalion occupying well-fortified emplacements in the Mutter's Ridge area of Quang Tri Province. During the ensuing three-day engagement which culminated in a decisive rout of the numerically-superior enemy force, Petty Officer James personally organized the company aid stations and casualty clearing points, and attended each of the numerous casualties sustained by the company, continually exposing himself to intense artillery and mortar fire in order to maneuver across the hazardous terrain and treat his injured companions. On several occasions, Petty Officer James protected wounded Marines from further injury by shielding them with his own body. During one intense artillery attack, he rushed outside the defensive perimeter to aid a seriously-wounded Marine, and calmly rendered first aid before carrying the man to a medical evacuation helicopter. Petty Officer James demonstrated a sincere concern for the welfare of his comrades throughout this fierce battle, repeatedly refusing rest or protective cover in order to ensure the proper treatment and expeditious evacuation of his patients. His heroic actions and extraordinary professional skill undoubtedly saved the lives of several Marines and inspired all who observed him. By his courage, resolute determination, and selfless devotion to duty, Petty Officer James upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Captain Frank W. Tuckwiller (Silver Star - 9Sep68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Frank W. Tuckwiller (MCSN: 0-87149), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 9 September 1968, Company B was assigned to occupy Hill 461 in Quang Tri Province, and as the Marines maneuvered up the slope of the hill, they came under intense small arms fire from a large North Vietnamese Army force and sustained several casualties. Rapidly assessing the situation, Captain Tuckwiller quickly consolidated his company and directed the evacuation of the wounded. Completely disregarding his own safety, he fearlessly moved about the fire-swept terrain, shouting words of encouragement to his Marines and directing their fire upon the hostile soldiers while deploying his unit into night defensive positions. Continuing his determined efforts, he repeatedly inspected his perimeter throughout the night as he directed artillery fire upon the enemy force with devastating effectiveness. Early on the following morning, Company B resumed the assault and again made contact with the North Vietnamese force. Realizing that the enemy had withdrawn from their positions and were not attempting to seize the hill, Captain Tuckwiller boldly led his men to the objective and, rapidly establishing defensive emplacements, continued to direct supporting arms fire against the hostile soldiers. His heroic actions and aggressive fighting spirit inspired all who served with him and contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission. By his courage, superb leadership and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Captain Tuckwiller upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


09Sep68          AWARDED the SILVER STAR Co: B L/CPL Richard K. TILGHMAN

(Citation) (Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Lance Corporal Richard K. Tilghman (MCSN: 2422175), United States Marine Corps, was awarded the Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on September 9, 1968. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Lance Corporal Tilghman upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service


Lance Corporal Merle E. Robertson (Silver Star Posthumously - 10Sep68)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Merle E. Robertson (MCSN: 2388054), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 10 September 1968, while conducting an attack on Hill 461 near the Rockpile, elements of Company B came under a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire from a large enemy force and sustained several casualties. During the ensuing fire fight, Lance Corporal Robertson repeatedly exposed himself to intense fire as he maneuvered from one position to another, delivering accurate fire against the enemy and administering first aid to the wounded. On one occasion, he fearlessly stood erect in an open area and fired directly into a hostile position, enabling a Marine squad to advance and destroy two enemy bunkers. While maneuvering across the fire-swept terrain to assist another seriously wounded, Marine, Lance Corporal Robertson was mortally wounded by enemy fire. His heroic actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving the lives of several Marines. By his courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Robertson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.


Sergeant John C. Hair III (Silver Star - 10Sep68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John C. Hair, III (MCSN: 2145572), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Guide with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 10 September 1968, elements of Company B were attacking a North Vietnamese Army company occupying well-fortified bunkers in the Mutter's Ridge area of Quang Tri Province. Rapidly assessing the situation, Sergeant Hair unhesitatingly moved forward to the lead element and repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy small arms fire as he threw hand grenades at the hostile bunkers. Continuing his determined efforts, he drew the enemy's fire to his own position enabling his Marines to maneuver to the hostile unit's flank and destroy the emplacements. The following day his platoon discovered another group of well concealed enemy bunkers. Maneuvering across the hazardous terrain into a position from which he could fire on the fortified structures, Sergeant Hair accurately marked the enemy positions with small arms fire, thereby allowing his comrades to engage and destroy the North Vietnamese Army positions. His heroic actions and resolute determination inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in his unit accounting for fifteen enemy bunkers destroyed, sixteen North Vietnamese soldiers killed and numerous weapons captured. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty at great personal risk, Sergeant Hair upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal Roy Cisneros (Navy Cross Posthumously - 11Sep68)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Corporal Roy Cisneros (MCSN: 2341534), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 11 September 1968. While conducting a reconnaissance in force, Company B came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from a North Vietnamese Army company occupying fortified positions on Hill 461 in Quang Tri Province. During the ensuing fire fight, Corporal Cisneros skillfully maneuvered his squad across the hazardous terrain and, directing the fire of his men with devastating accuracy, was instrumental in the destruction of three enemy bunkers. When his men were pinned down by a heavy volume of fire from a fourth emplacement, he boldly advanced and single-handedly attempted to destroy the enemy position. After firing a light antitank assault weapon into the bunker, he fearlessly hurled hand grenades at the defenders as he aggressively continued his assault. Disregarding his own safety, he commenced firing his rifle and was delivering effective fire upon the North Vietnamese emplacements, when he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. His resolute determination and intrepid fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in his unit accounting for 45 North Vietnamese soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, aggressive leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Cisneros upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


First Lieutenant Ancer L. Haggerty (Silver Star 11Sep68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Ancer L. Haggerty (MCSN: 0-100493), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. Early on the morning of 11 September 1968, Lieutenant Haggerty assumed command of a platoon which had been heavily engaged with a North Vietnamese Army battalion near Mutter's Ridge in Quang Tri Province. Rapidly assessing the situation, he immediately commenced reorganizing the platoon, encouraging his men, and molding them into an effective fighting unit. Shortly before dawn, the Marines were attacked on two flanks by a large North Vietnamese Army force employing small arms and machine gun fire. Swiftly rallying his men, Lieutenant Haggerty fearlessly led the platoon in a bold counterattack, destroying hostile emplacements which had been established during the assault and forcing the enemy soldiers to withdraw. As the Marines maneuvered toward the company's defensive perimeter, they sustained extensive fragmentation wounds in the legs, arms, and chest. Ignoring his extremely painful injuries, Lieutenant Haggerty unhesitatingly exposed himself to the heavy volume of enemy fire as he directed his men to covered positions within the company lines. Steadfastly refusing medical attention, he resolutely continued his determined efforts until his unit was safely established in defensive positions. His bold initiative and resolute determination inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in his unit accounting for forty-nine hostile soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, extraordinary leadership, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Lieutenant Haggerty upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Hospitalman Chief Petty Officer Clarence E. Wallace (Silver Star - 14Nov68)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Clarence E. Wallace (NSN: B-310534), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Corpsman with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 14 November 1968, the Second Platoon was conducting a patrol in the Mutter's Ridge area of Quang Tri Province when the Marines came under intense hostile fire and sustained several casualties. Rapidly assessing the situation, Hospitalman Wallace disregarded his own safety as he fearlessly moved across fire-swept terrain to reach the injured men and administer first aid. When key personnel were seriously wounded during the ensuing fire fight, he skillfully supervised the evacuation of the casualties to a collection point several hundred meters down the trail and quickly established a defensive perimeter. Personally taking charge of the platoon's radio, he established and maintained communications with the company command group to report the tactical situation, thereby enabling his commander to dispatch a reaction force and provide supporting fire for the beleaguered platoon. Although painfully wounded, he ignored his own injuries as he moved among the casualties throughout the night to comfort and encourage the wounded Marines and prepare them for evacuation on the following morning. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving many Marines from further injury or possible death. By his courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Hospitalman Wallace upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


06Dec68  to  08Mar69                        TAYLOR COMMON


Colonel Michael Melvin Spark (Navy Cross Posthumously -15Jan69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Colonel Michael Melvin Spark (MCSN: 0-49041), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 15 January 1969. During a multi-battalion search and clear operation in the vicinity of An Hoa, Colonel Spark exhibited outstanding courage and presence of mind in the midst of violent combat action. While commanding a bold, highly imaginative, mobile operation in the mountainous terrain, Colonel Spark directed an assault against heavily fortified enemy positions. After ensuring that his men were properly positioned, Colonel Spark went airborne, by the use of a helicopter, to observe and direct the operation. During the process of the operation, it was necessary for the helicopter to descend, and as the helicopter hovered over the landing zone, which had been hastily cut out of the jungle, the enemy took the aircraft under automatic-weapons fire. Despite the enemy fire, he defiantly continued the personal direction of his men until finally the helicopter was hit and caused to crash. As the helicopter impacted, the enemy continued firing upon it, killing all the occupants. Throughout the entire operation, Colonel Spark placed requirements for full and direct support of his combat elements above any concern for his own personal safety. He spent the majority of his time with his forward-most units in order to effectively control the action. This enabled him to maximize exploitation of many situations, and served as an inspiration to the officers and enlisted Marines of his command. By his intrepid fighting spirit, daring initiative, and unswerving dedication to duty, Colonel Spark upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


22Jan69           AWARDED the SILVER STAR Co: A L/CPL John H. RICHARDS Jr

                        (Citation) Unable to Locate!


Lance Corporal Bernard G. Purvis (Silver Star Posthumously -29Jan69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Bernard G. Purvis (MCSN: 2391296), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 29 January 1969, Lance Corporal Purvis' squad was participating in a combat patrol near An Hoa in Quang Nam Province when the Marines came under a heavy volume of hostile fire delivered by a well-concealed enemy force. Reacting instantly, he skillfully deployed his men into effective fighting positions and unhesitatingly led an aggressive assault against the hostile unit. Completely disregarding his own safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire as he fearlessly moved about the hazardous area, shouting words of encouragement to his men and directing their accurate fire upon the hostile emplacements until he was mortally wounded. His outstanding leadership and aggressive fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in the subsequent defeat of the enemy. By his courage, bold initiative and unfaltering devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Purvis contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.


Corporal Thomas R. Davis (Silver Star Posthumously - 31Jan69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Thomas R. Davis (MCSN: 2416988), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 31 January 1969, Company C was conducting a patrol near An Hoa in Quang Nam Province when the Marines came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from a well-concealed enemy force. Alertly observing the hostile position and rapidly assessing the crucial situation, Corporal Davis unhesitatingly exposed himself to the enemy fire to more effectively maneuver his men into a tactical formation. Assuming a vantage point in front of his Marines, he fearlessly led them in a determined assault on the hostile emplacements, shouting words of encouragement to his men and boldly directing their fire until he was struck by the enemy fire and fell mortally wounded. His daring initiative and heroic efforts inspired all who observed him and contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Davis upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Corporal Garland G. Whalen (Silver Star Posthumously - 31Jan69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Garland G. Whalen (MCSN: 2287396), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 31 January 1969, Corporal Whalen's squad was participating in a combat patrol near An Hoa in Quang Nam Province when the Marines came under a heavy volume of hostile fire delivered by a well-concealed enemy force. Reacting instantly, he skillfully deployed his men into effective fighting positions and unhesitatingly led an aggressive assault against the hostile unit. Completely disregarding his own safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire as he fearlessly moved about the hazardous area, shouting words of encouragement to his men and directing their accurate fire upon the hostile emplacements until he was mortally wounded. His outstanding leadership and aggressive fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in the subsequent defeat of the enemy. By his courage, bold initiative and unfaltering devotion to duty, Corporal Whalen contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


30Apr69  to  16Jul69                          VIRGINIA RIDGE


Corporal William Dean Langley (Silver Star - 1May69)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William Dean Langley (MCSN: 2447716), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Guide with Company D, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 1 May 1969, Company D was conducting a patrol approximately five miles northwest of Cam Lo in Quang Tri Province, when the Marines came under intense small arms fire from a well-concealed enemy bunker complex, and sustained several casualties. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Langley repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire in order to evacuate wounded Marines from hazardous areas. During the ensuing fire fight, when it became necessary for the platoon sergeant to take the place of a wounded officer, Corporal Langley unhesitatingly assumed the duties of Platoon Sergeant and fearlessly led an attack against the bunker complex, but the platoon became pinned down by a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire. Alertly observing that a major source of the enemy's fire was one specific bunker, he rushed forward alone and destroyed the position with hand grenades, thereby permitting the remainder of the platoon to rout the enemy. His heroic and timely actions were instrumental in the destruction of the hostile positions and were responsible for saving the lives of several wounded Marines. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Corporal Langley upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


Corporal James A. Jenkins (Silver Star Posthumously - 20May69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal James A. Jenkins (MCSN: 2339189), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 20 May 1969 during Operation Virginia Ridge, Company C was occupying a night defensive position in Quang Tri Province. Suddenly the Marines came under a fierce attack by a reinforced North Vietnamese Army platoon supported by grenades, rocket-propelled grenades, and small arms fire. Reacting instantly, Lance Corporal Jenkins unhesitatingly left his relatively safe position and began directing the defense of the area. Continuously exposing himself to the intense volume of enemy fire, he moved through the hazardous area, distributing ammunition and shouting words of encouragement to his men. When the battle had ceased, his unit was assigned the mission of searching for enemy casualties and their equipment. Having begun the search, Lance Corporal Jenkins, sensing the presence of hostile soldiers in the area, fearlessly assumed the point position, and after his squad had moved twenty-five meters, he was mortally wounded by the detonation of a hostile rocket-propelled grenade round. His bold initiative and heroic efforts inspired all who observed him and were responsible for saving the lives of the men in his squad. By his courage, aggressive leadership and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Lance Corporal Jenkins upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Private First Class John S. Taylor (Silver Star Posthumously - 20May69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John S. Taylor (MCSN: 2369008), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 20 May 1969, Company C was participating in a combat operation northwest of Cam Lo in Quang Tri Province when the Marines came under a fierce attack by a North Vietnamese Army force. Reacting instantly, Private First Class Taylor fearlessly disregarded his own safety as he repeatedly moved to vantage points from which to deliver intense suppressive fire against the invading unit. Observing a wounded companion fall in a position dangerously exposed to the hostile fire, he unhesitatingly raced across the hazardous terrain to the side of the wounded by enemy small arms fire. By his courage, selfless concern for his fellowman and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Taylor inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.


First Lieutenant William F. Ryan (Silver Star - 24May69)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William F. Ryan (MCSN: 0-104333), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company C, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 24 May 1969. While Company C was conducting a search and destroy operation northwest of Cam Lo, the Marines came under a heavy volume of mortar fire and, during the initial moments of the attack, sustained several casualties. Reacting instantly, First Lieutenant Ryan unhesitatingly left his relatively secure position and, racing across the fire-swept terrain to a forward mortar emplacement, rendered first aid to several men and fearlessly moved them to a covered position to await medical evacuation. During the ensuing fierce engagement, he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense hostile fire as he moved through the hazardous area from one Marine position to another to distribute ammunition and encourage his men. While assisting in the delivery of suppressive counter mortar fire, First Lieutenant Ryan was seriously wounded but, disregarding the pain of his injuries, resolutely continued his combat efforts until the severity of his wounds forced his medical evacuation. His courageous and determined actions inspired all who served with him and were instrumental in suppressing the enemy fire. First Lieutenant Ryan's courage, aggressive leadership, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger saved the lives of two Marines, reflected great credit upon himself, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


17Jul69  to 27Sep69                           IDAHO CANYON


Lance Corporal Henry Ballew Jr. (Silver Star Posthumously - 27Jul69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Henry Ballew, Jr. (MCSN: 2584132), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 27 July 1969, during Operation IDAHO CANYON, Company A was conducting a patrol approximately seven miles northwest of Cam Lo in Quang Tri Province. As Lance Corporal Ballew's squad was crossing a stream, the Marines came under intense hostile automatic weapons fire. Reacting instantly, he fired at the enemy and killed one of the hostile soldiers. Realizing the danger to several of his men who were still in the water, Lance Corporal Ballew unhesitatingly rushed up the stream toward the enemy firing his weapon and simultaneously directing the actions of his men. Fearlessly providing protective fire to cover the movement of squad members, Lance Corporal Ballew continued his selfless actions in the face of intense enemy fire until he was mortally wounded. His heroic action inspired all who observed him and enabled his companions to move out of the stream and defeat the enemy force. By his courage, bold initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Ballew upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Sergeant Alberto Torres Anzaldua (Silver Star Posthumously - 10Aug69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Alberto Torres Anzaldua (MCSN: 2019091), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 10 August 1969, the Third Platoon and the Command Group of Company A were heli-lifted to a hilltop approximately nine miles northwest of Cam Lo in Quang Tri Province and assigned the mission of relieving a friendly unit which was heavily engaged with the enemy. Upon debarking from the helicopter, Sergeant Anzaldua immediately established his men in defensive positions and assisted in carrying the wounded to the waiting medical evacuation aircraft. Suddenly, the Marines came under an intense volume of enemy mortar fire. Reacting instantly and with complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Anzaldua commenced firing his rifle at the North Vietnamese Army positions, temporarily silencing the hostile fire, and thereby saving his companions from further serious injury. Subsequently informed that the platoon had received several casualties who were located at the base of the hill, he fearlessly maneuvered to the designated area and, while carrying two severely wounded Marines to a position of relative safety, was mortally wounded by fragments of an enemy mortar round. His bold initiative and sincere concern for the welfare of his comrades inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving the lives of several Marines. By his courage, aggressive leadership and selfless devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Sergeant Anzaldua contributed significantly to the defeat of the North Vietnamese Army force and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Captain Gerald Hilbert Sampson (Navy Cross posthumously - 28Aug69)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Captain Gerald Hilbert Sampson (MCSN: 0-89284), United States Marine Corps Reserve, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. In the early morning hours of 28 August 1969, Company B, occupying a night defensive position deep in hostile territory northwest of Cam Lo, was assaulted by a large North Vietnamese Army force employing automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades. In the initial onslaught, the second platoon commander was wounded and his sector of the perimeter was in grave danger of being breached by the enemy. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Sampson moved across the fire-swept terrain to the point of heaviest contact, rallied the beleaguered Marines, and began to direct their fire against the advancing North Vietnamese. During the fierce fire fight, he continually moved from one fighting position to another, instructing and encouraging his men and ensuring that the wounded received immediate treatment. While maneuvering across an exposed area on the foremost edge of the perimeter, Captain Sampson was mortally wounded by enemy fire. His unflagging determination and bold fighting spirit inspired his men to heroic efforts and were instrumental in turning a critical situation into an overwhelming Marine victory. By his leadership, extraordinary courage and selfless devotion to duty, Captain Sampson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.